Meet the new HP Spectre: The world's thinnest laptop

HP continues its march toward premium PC territory with the new HP Spectre, which the company calls “the world’s thinnest laptop.” So far, the numbers stand up. According to HP, the 13-inch Spectre is 10.4mm thick, while Apple’s iconic MacBook Air is 17mm thick, as is the Lenovo LaVie (which can claim to be the world’s lightest 13-inch laptop). The 12-inch MacBook and the recent Razer Blade Stealth both clock in at 13mm thick.

When we get down to a few millimeters, one might think it wouldn’t make much of a difference, but a 17mm laptop feels very different from a 13mm laptop, and based on my short hands-on time with the HP Spectre, a 10.4mm laptop feels different from both of those.

 

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A bold color scheme also helps the Spectre stand out, ditching the usual silver/grey for a dark, smokey gray, with bold gold accents.The entire hinge is a bright, jeweled gold, which just draws more attention to its unusual design. To avoid unnecessary bulk, the hinge has moved in from the very rear edge, and is instead inset by a tiny bit. It’s a design we’ve seen on a handful of laptops over the years, although usually on much larger systems. That hinge is aluminum, as is the laptop’s lid, while the bottom panel is carbon fiber. HP says the mix of materials serves to give the Spectre the right balance between weight and stiffness, especially in the lid. At 2.45 pounds, this isn’t close to being the lightest 13-inch laptop ever, but it’s still very easy to pick up and carry around.

Inside the body, according to a deconstructed version of the system I was able to look at, a standard laptop battery is flattened down into multiple separate very thin cells, to fit across most of the bottom footprint. HP also uses smaller fans to pull air in and through the laptop, rather than exclusively pushing hot air out. It’s a version of a cooling scheme from Intel which it calls hyperbaric cooling.

 

source-cnet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google's New Chromecast, Chromecast Audio May Launch Soon in India

When Google unveiled the refreshed Chromecast alongside the Chromecast Audio in September last year, the Mountain View giant was expected to bring the devices to India as well, as the first-generation Chromecast was already officially available in India. Seven months have passed however, and there’s no update from Google on the availability of its new Chromecast and Chromecast Audio.

Now, in a glimmer of hope, Android Police reports that Google has finally refreshed its official hardware availability page adding countries including India and Taiwan to receive the new Chromecast and Chromecast Audio – this usually signals availability via the country-specific Google Store. Unfortunately, either Google has since updated the page, or the details are not visible in India, as at the time of writing the page only showed the old list.

Launched in September, the second-generation Chromecast saw a complete departure from the original’s design. The all new design saw looped inside a circular Chromecast logo-shaped unit. The company also upgraded the internal components to make the new Chromecast more capable and added three antennas inside the device. The device supported 5GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi for stutter-free high quality streaming. It comes with a new feature called “Fast Play,” allowing the Chromecast to start a video or audio streaming much quicker to start, once users press the Cast button. Notably, Google maintained the same $35 price point as the original.

 

 

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Google’s Chromecast Audio streaming device, also priced at $35 (roughly Rs. 2,300), allows one to stream music to their regular speakers directly from a smartphone or laptop. Chromecast Audio is said to not compress audio, assuring the audiophile inside you that the device wouldn’t compromise on audio quality. It works with Android and iOS devices, apart from PCs. The device supports high-quality audio, 2 watt RMS, and an optional optical digital out that sits in the hybrid port. It additionally includes a feature called guest access, allowing others to stream even if they are not connected to the user’s Wi-Fi network.

 

 

source- NDTV

A closer look at the Microsoft HoloLens (pictures).

Microsoft’s HoloLens is one of the most magical pieces of technology I’ve ever seen. It could change the world. But if you bought one today, for your own personal use, I guarantee you’d hate it.

For over a year, journalists have written breathless descriptions of the amazing things they’ve seen inside the HoloLens headset, but they’ve never been able to give you the full picture. Microsoft planned it that way. The first time I tried HoloLens, I actually had to surrender my camera and phone, only to walk through a set of scripted experiences in a secret bunker underneath Microsoft’s Redmond campus.

It was exciting stuff. And still is, honestly. Have you seen our video yet?gggggggg

But this week, Microsoft let us see what it’s actually like to use HoloLens for real. I spent 90 minutes with an actual $3,000 Microsoft HoloLens Development Edition on my head, watching as computer-generated objects popped into existence in my real world. I walked around an ordinary hotel suite, with no Microsoft supervision, and saw what these holograms were capable of. It made my mind swirl with the possibilities

It also made me very, very glad that Microsoft has no intention of ever releasing the current developer kit to regular, non-developer people. It’s not even close to ready.

 

 

source-cnet

How to choose the right microSD card for your Android

There are a lot of microSD cards to choose from, but not all of them will work with your Android phone or tablet. When you’re choosing between SDHC and SDXC, or a Class 10 and UHS-I Class 1, here are a few tips to help you make sure you’re choosing the best one for your device and your needs.
Capacity

You’ll most often come across two types of microSD cards — SDHC and SDXC. The difference between the two is the range in capacities they provide.

SDHC cards have a capacity of 2GB to 32GB. Alternatively, SDXC cards can range from 32GB to 2TB. To put this in perspective, one photo taken on a 16MP camera is about 7MB worth of data. If you purchase a 32GB card, you could store 4,500 or more photos on it. (This number would differ if you’re using a Galaxy S7, which can shoot in RAW format, creating photos with much larger file sizes.)

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You might be tempted to choose the largest capacity, but you’ll need to check what your device supports.

Galaxy S and S7 Edge: 200GB
LG V10: 2TB
Moto G 2015: 32GB
Xperia Z5 Compact: 200GB
OneTouch Idol 3: 32GB

Speed

Once you choose a card capacity, it’s time to choose its speed. The speed class of your card determines how quickly it can write data. When you’re working with video, or bursts of photos, the faster the better.

Most newer mobile devices will support three primary speed classes: Class 10, UHS-1 Class 1, and UHS-1 Class 3. UHS stands for Ultra High Speed, and currently has two bus types (the connection between card and phone hardware), labeled I and II, which help determine the card’s maximum speed. UHS-2 cards — which feature an extra row of pins — are being produced, but a limited number of mobile devices support them.

MicroSDHC and microSDXC cards can be any of these three classes, since capacity and speed are not directly related. Since maximum speed is only provided by some manufacturers on packaging, here are the minimum speeds and intended purposes of each class:

source – cnet